WELCOME TO NBIS

 


Norfolk Biodiversity Information Service (NBIS) is a Local Record Centre holding information on species, geodiversity, habitats and protected sites for the whole of the county of Norfolk. NBIS is a member of the Association of Local Environmental Records Centres and operates within the guidelines of the National Biodiversity Network. NBIS functions with guidance from a Steering Group, serving the need for environmental information in Norfolk through the collection, collation, assessment and interpretation of high quality data.

 

NBIS provides:

·         A single source of environmental information for Norfolk

·         Collation of available data for Norfolk

·         Validation and evaluation of these data

·         Identification of gaps in knowledge – taxonomic, geographical and temporal

·         A permanent and secure location for data

·         Improved flow of data from individual recorders to users at both local and national levels

·         Quick and easy access to information for all

 

NBIS Facebook wall

GRID SQUARE OF THE MONTH - TG3306 Strumpshaw Fen

Many thanks to all of you who have submitted records of our Species of the Month over the last couple of years. We are trying something new for 2015 – grid square of the month. Each month we will highlight a 1km grid square somewhere in Norfolk, and ask you to help record as many species as possible from within that grid square. At the end of the year we will see which grid square has the highest number of records submitted.

For August, our Grid Square of the Month is TG3306 (Strumpshaw Fen)

Click the map below and let us know (or use buttons below):

NB: To see a larger version of the above grid square map, please click here

A popular RSPB Reserve, Strumpshaw Fen is home to a fantastic array of wildlife, including rarities such as swallowtail butterfly and bittern. This grid square includes much of the walk around the broads and marsh area, including the two main bird hides, and part of the River Yare. There is a small charge for non RSPB members to enter the reserve, which is open from dawn until dusk.

It doesn’t have to be a rare or unusual species – records of common and widespread species are just as important. From blackbirds to oak trees, hedgehogs to ladybirds, let’s see how many species can be recorded within the grid square!

Remember, trespassing is a crime, so only go to areas accessible to the public.

GRID SQUARE OF THE MONTH - TF9145 Wells-next-the-Sea

Many thanks to all of you who have submitted records of our Species of the Month over the last couple of years. We are trying something new for 2015 – grid square of the month. Each month we will highlight a 1km grid square somewhere in Norfolk, and ask you to help record as many species as possible from within that grid square. At the end of the year we will see which grid square has the highest number of records submitted.

For July, our Grid Square of the Month is TF9145 (Wells-next-the-Sea)

Click the map below and let us know (or use buttons below):

NB: To see a larger version of the above grid square map, please click here

This square is found at the end of the bank as you walk out from Wells-next-the-Sea towards the beach. It includes the end of the bank, part of the beach, a section of the estuary, the caravan park and boating lake and the start of Wells Wood.

It doesn’t have to be a rare or unusual species – records of common and widespread species are just as important. From blackbirds to oak trees, hedgehogs to ladybirds, let’s see how many species can be recorded within the grid square!

Remember, trespassing is a crime, so only go to areas accessible to the public.

News

 

The July E-Bulletin ("Biodiversity News in Norfolk"): available to DOWNLOAD NOW (30/07/15)

Download and read no. 46 here. 

You can also fill in our reader survey for the E-bulletin here.

Sign up for our monthly e-bulletin - get the latest biodiversity news by clicking here and sending

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A collection of interesting national biodiversity news from July (30/07/15)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11702791/Cats-may-have-ni... Cants may have nine lives but mice don't, owners told. The Telegraph 26 Jun 2015

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/killer-plants-a-handy-gu... Killer plants: A handy guide to the hidden dangers in your garden. The Independent 26 June 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jun/28/rwanda-lions-reintroduced-s... Lions to be reintroduced to Rwanda after 15-year absence following genocide. The Guardian 28 June 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jun/29/barack-obama-turns-ta... Barak Obama turns tables in David Attenborough climate change interview. The Guardian 29 June 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/01/great-barrier-reef-sp... Unesco spares Great Barrier Reef 'in danger' listing but issues warning. The Guardian 1 Jul 2015

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11714912/Mystery-beast-sp... Mystery 'beast' spotted roaming Plymouth suburbs. The Telegraph 2 Jul 2015

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11712379/Scientists-disco... Scientists dicover lizard that changes sex in the sun. The Telegraph 2 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/09/bumblebee-habitat-shr... Climate change causing bumblebee habitat loss, say scientists. The Guardian 9 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/jul/10/coyote-attacks-children-c... Two coyote attacks on young children prompt California to warn residents. The Guardian 10 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/14/bees-infected-with-co... Bees infected with common gut parasite work less and die younger, finds study. The Guardian 14 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/gardening-blog/2015/jul/15/giant... Giant hogweed; digging deeper into the history of a 'killer weed'. The Guardian 15 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/16/australian-government... Australian government declares war on feral cats in bid to save native animals. The Guardian 16 Jul 2015

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/number-of-puffin-pairs-p... Number of Puffin pairs plummets on Shetland. The Independent 17 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/21/genetic-traits-of-fis... Genetic traits of fish key to whether they can survive climate change. The Guardian 21 Jul 2015

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-33612294 Growing threat to England's curlews from climate change. BBC Environment 22 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/radical-conservation/2015/jul/23/... Scientists: we are 'condemning' forest elephants by ignoring evidence. The Guardian 23 Jul 2015

http://www.independent.ie/world-news/europe/birds-and-butterflies-suffer... Birds and butterflies 'suffering severe decline' on farmland in UK. Independent.IE 23 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/23/endangered-puget-soun... Number of endangered Puget Sound orcas increase slightly in latest count. The Guardian 23 Jul 2015

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/11759784/Main... Maine fisherman catches rare bright orange lobster. The Telegraph 24 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/27/only-100-tigers-left-... Only 100 tigers left in Bangladesh's famed Sundarbans forest. The Guardian 27 Jul 2015

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jul/27/thirteen-new-spider-s... Thirteen new spider species discovered in Australia's north. The Guardian 27 Jul 2015

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NNNSI "Urban Invaders" Invasive Alien Species Survey

Humans are increasingly moving species outside their natural range, sometimes deliberately and sometimes accidentally. In the absence of their natural enemies, some species can spread rapidly and cause problems. These species are termed
‘invasive’.

Invasive non-native species are considered to be one of the most important causes of biodiversity loss worldwide, second only to habitat destruction and fragmentation.
They can also have significant economic impacts. One recent estimate put their cost at almost £2 billion a year in the UK alone!

Urban areas are a hotspot for invasive non-native plants. Our new survey - Urban Invaders - aims to help improve the quality of our data on some of the most damaging invasive plants found in Norfolk. We need YOU to help by telling us when
and where you see them.

THE URBAN INVADERS SURVEY SPECIES ARE:

New Zealand Pigmyweed/Australian Swamp-stonecrop (Crassula helmsii)
Floating pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides)
Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera)
Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)
Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica)
Tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima)

Download the Urban Invaders Leaflet here

Norfolk Species Surveillance Network

NBIS needs you!

Norfolk Species Surveillance Network 

 

NBIS are continuing to develop their Multi-taxon species monitoring initiative known as the Norfolk Species Surveillance Network (NSSN), launched in 2013.

We are expanding this network and the recording levels on them, hence needing as many people as possible to volunteer to monitor species change across Norfolk.  We are looking for individuals or local parish/conservation groups to get involved.  No previous experience of the methodology is necessary, just a passion for wildlife.

Events



Norwich Bat Group Events
Summer bat walks with the Norwich bat group
http://www.norwichbatgroup.co.uk/events/

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